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To grasp water scarcity, researchers probe links between human and natural systems

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:26:55 EDT - Understanding the fine-level interactions between nature and people is essential in determining whether a region will suffer water scarcity in the future.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023182655.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Five new malaria targets that could lead to an effective vaccine

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:26:07 EDT - In the largest study of its kind, five new malaria vaccine targets have been discovered. Researchers studied the malaria parasite at its most vulnerable stage -- when invading human red blood cells -- and identified five targets that lead to a reduction in the parasite's ability to enter red blood cells.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023182607.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Why did the 2014 Oso, WA, landslide travel so far?

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:25:49 EDT - On Saturday, 22 March 2014, a devastating landslide roared across the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River, near Oso, Washington. The landslide killed 43 people as it plowed through the Steelhead Haven neighborhood. When it stopped, after crossing the river, the neighborhood, and State Route 530, the Oso landslide had traveled 1.4 kilometers.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023182549.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Florida needs more pet-friendly shelters

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:25:44 EDT - Florida needs more pet-friendly shelters, especially for older adults who represent 50 to 75 percent of deaths following disasters like hurricanes, according to a recent study.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023182544.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New asthma biomarkers identified from lung bacteria

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:25:39 EDT - New research suggests that the lung microbiome plays a significant role in asthma severity and response to treatment.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023182539.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Older Neanderthal survived with a little help from his friends

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:15:52 EDT - An older Neanderthal from about 50,000 years ago, who had suffered multiple injuries and other degenerations, became deaf and must have relied on the help of others to avoid prey and survive well into his 40s, indicates a new analysis.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023181552.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Archaeologists uncover cuneiform archive in Iraq’s Kurdish region

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 18:03:03 EDT - Archaeologists have made sensational finds in the Kurdistan region of northern Iraq. The researchers found a cuneiform archive of 93 clay tablets dating from 1250 BCE -- the period of the Middle Assyrian Empire. What the tablets record remains a mystery for the time being. The researchers will have to decipher them -- a long and difficult task.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023180303.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Fruit-eating increases biodiversity

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 15:05:41 EDT - By dispersing the seeds of plants, fruit-eating animals contribute to the possibility of increased plant speciation and thus biodiversity, investigators have discovered.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023150541.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New magma pathways after giant lateral volcano collapses

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:55:53 EDT - Giant lateral collapses are huge landslides occurring at the flanks of a volcano. Such collapses are rather common events during the evolution of a large volcanic edifice, often with dramatic consequences such as tsunami and volcano explosions. These catastrophic events interact with the magmatic activity of the volcano, as new research suggests.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023145553.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Moment of impact: A journey into the Chicxulub Crater

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:09:14 EDT - When the Chicxulub asteroid slammed into Earth about 66 million years ago, it obliterated 80 percent of Earth's species, blasted out a crater 200 kilometers across, and signaled an abrupt end to the Cretaceous Period. The impact, its catastrophic effects, and its aftermath have engrossed scientists and the public alike since it was first discovered.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023140914.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New Peruvian bird species discovered by its song

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:09:06 EDT - A new species of bird from the heart of Peru remained undetected for years until researchers identified it by its unique song.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023140906.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Possible new anti-TB treatment path

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:09:03 EDT - As part of the long effort to improve treatment of tuberculosis (TB), microbiologists report that they have for the first time characterized a protein involved in making a glycolipid compound found in the TB cell wall, which is critical for the disease-causing Mycobacterium to become infectious.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023140903.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Herbicide's link to Parkinson's disease

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 14:07:34 EDT - Scientists have revealed how oxidative stress explains a common herbicide's link to risk of Parkinson's disease.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023140734.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Rethinking well-being and sustainability measurements from local to global scales

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:20:11 EDT - A new study suggests that standard ways of measuring well-being and sustainability in communities used by global organizations may be missing critical information and could lead to missteps in management actions. The article suggests alternative and complementary approaches that use indicators grounded in the values of a particular community.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023132011.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Smart birds: Canada geese give hunters the slip by hiding out in Chicago

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:20:09 EDT - It's open season for Canada geese in Illinois from mid-October to mid-January. Unfortunately for hunters, Canada geese are finding a new way to stay out of the line of fire. Rather than being 'sitting ducks' in a rural pond, they're setting up residence in the city. Ornithologists conducted a recent study to try to find out why there were so many Canada geese in Chicago in the winter.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023132009.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Rising sea levels creating first Native American climate refugees

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 13:20:06 EDT - Rising sea levels and human activities are fast creating a 'worst case scenario' for Native Americans of the Mississippi Delta who stand to lose not just their homes, but their irreplaceable heritage, to climate change.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023132006.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Scientists develop new theory of molecular evolution

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:38:15 EDT - Researchers have developed a new theory of molecular evolution, offering insights into how genes function, how the rates of evolutionary divergence can be predicted, and how harmful mutations arise at a basic level.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023123815.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

These shrews have heads that shrink with the season

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:36:31 EDT - If any part of the body would seem ill equipped to shrink, it would probably be the head and skull. And, yet, researchers have found that the skulls of red-toothed shrews do shrink in anticipation of winter, by up to 20 percent. As spring approaches, their heads grow again to approach their previous size.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023123631.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Reduced impact logging still harms biodiversity in tropical rainforests

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:35:46 EDT - Even low levels of logging in the Amazon rainforest may lead to great losses in biodiversity, new research has found. The research looked at 34 different plots in the state of Pará -- a focal point for Amazon protection efforts in the last decades. They found that even low levels of logging leaded to negative effects on dung beetle diversity and rates of dung beetle-mediated


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023123546.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Scientists warn that saline lakes in dire situation worldwide

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:35:37 EDT - Saline lakes around the world are shrinking in size at alarming rates. But what -- or who -- is to blame? Lakes like Utah's Great Salt Lake, Asia's Aral Sea, the Dead Sea in Jordan and Israel, China's huge Lop Nur and Bolivia's Lake Popo are just a few that are in peril. These lakes and others like them are suffering massive environmental problems according to a group of scientists and water managers.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023123537.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Mongolian microfossils point to the rise of animals on Earth

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:35:30 EDT - A cache of embryo-like microfossils has been discovered in northern Mongolia that may shed light on questions about the long-ago shift from microbes to animals on Earth.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023123530.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Transparent solar technology represents 'wave of the future'

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:35:26 EDT - See-through solar materials that can be applied to windows represent a massive source of untapped energy and could harvest as much power as bigger, bulkier rooftop solar units, scientists report.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023123526.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Sumatran tigers on path to recovery in 'in danger' UNESCO World Heritage site

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 12:29:30 EDT - New research looks at the effectiveness of the park's protection zone and finds that the density of Sumatran tigers has increased despite the continued threat of living in an 'In Danger' World Heritage Site.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023122930.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Expanding Brazilian sugarcane could dent global CO2 emissions

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 11:05:37 EDT - Vastly expanding sugarcane production in Brazil for conversion to ethanol could reduce current global carbon dioxide emissions by as much as 5.6 percent, researchers report. This can be accomplished without impinging on environmentally sensitive areas in Brazil and while allowing for the expansion of other agricultural crops and human needs, the researchers report.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023110537.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Immune response: Scientists identify 'first responders' to bacterial invasion

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:47:23 EDT - When bacteria enter our body, they kick-start a powerful immune response. But this chain of reactions doesn't fully account for our immediate responses. Researchers show that so-called ion channels play a key role as 'first responders'.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023104723.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Consumers see ‘organic’ and ‘non-GM’ food labels as synonymous

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:22:28 EDT - What are the best ways to communicate whether a food has GM ingredients? To gauge consumers’ willingness to pay for food labeled as GM vs. non-GM, researchers conducted a national survey of 1,132 respondents.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023102228.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Routes out of isolation for Yellowstone grizzlies

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:18:07 EDT - An interagency team of Montana and Wyoming biologists models possible routes to a reunion of the Yellowstone and Northern Continental bear populations through adventurous male immigrants. An influx of genetic diversity through breeding with outsiders could give the Yellowstone grizzly population greater resiliency to changing environmental conditions.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023101807.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Western US Quake? Fifty simulations of the 'Really Big One' show how a 9.0 Cascadia earthquake could play out

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:18:03 EDT - The largest number yet of detailed simulations for how a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake might play out provides a clearer picture of what the region can expect when the fault unleashes a 9.0 earthquake.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023101803.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Genetic rescue boosts recovery of Australia's endangered mountain pygmy possums

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 10:17:50 EDT - For the first time, a breeding technique known as genetic rescue has been shown to increase population numbers and survival rates of the endangered mountain pygmy possum, now at their highest numbers since 1996.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023101750.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Crops evolving ten millennia before experts thought

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:49:42 EDT - Ancient hunter-gatherers began to systemically affect the evolution of crops up to thirty thousand years ago -- around ten millennia before experts previously thought -- according to new research.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094942.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Groundwater, tundra fires may work together to thaw permafrost

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:46:33 EDT - Groundwater may play an unrecognized role in thawing Arctic permafrost following wildfires, according to new research.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094633.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Geophysicist finds teaching opportunities in movie mistakes

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:46:27 EDT - Few scientists regard the 1997 movie Volcano, in which flaming magma suddenly spews from the La Brea tar pits and incinerates much of Los Angeles, as a means to foster scientific literacy. After all, Southern California has no magma to spew. But one geophysicist sees it differently.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094627.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Limited data on medical cannabis use in children

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:46:06 EDT - A systematic review of published studies on the use of medical cannabis in children and adolescents finds a notable lack of studies and a minimal number of the randomized, controlled trials needed to confirm the effectiveness of a treatment.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094606.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

How the microbiome is linked to autoimmune disorders

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:44:58 EDT - A new study reveals a new mechanism in the gut microbiome that regulates pro- and anti-inflammatory cells.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094458.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Vaquita porpoise rescued as part of VaquitaCPR conservation project, then released

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:44:50 EDT - Scientists with the VaquitaCPR conservation project announced they succeeded in locating and rescuing a highly endangered vaquita porpoise yesterday, but in an abundance of caution the vaquita, which was a calf, was released. VaquitaCPR is trying to save the world's most endangered marine mammal. Less than 30 are left in the world.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094450.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Key discoveries offer significant hope of reversing antibiotic resistance

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:44:31 EDT - Two recent studies provide significant new hope in the fight against antibiotic resistance. By identifying what makes some bacteria resistant to the most commonly prescribed antibiotics, and how this can be reversed, the findings have demonstrated potentially life-saving consequences and could help reverse the tide of antibiotic resistance.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094431.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Zircon as Earth's timekeeper: Are we reading the clock right?

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:44:23 EDT - Zircon crystals in igneous rocks must be carefully examined and not relied upon solely to predict future volcanic eruptions and other tectonic events, researchers have shown.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094423.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Birds without own brood help other birds with parenting, but not selflessly

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:44:11 EDT - Birds will sometimes care for the offspring of other birds of their own species if they anticipate future benefits. Being tolerated in another bird's territory and the chance to inherit that territory later are considered rewards for which some birds are willing to postpone their own chance of reproduction.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094411.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Electricity from shale gas vs. coal: Lifetime toxic releases from coal much higher

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:43:58 EDT - Despite widespread concern about potential human health impacts from hydraulic fracturing, the lifetime toxic chemical releases associated with coal-generated electricity are 10 to 100 times greater than those from electricity generated with natural gas obtained via fracking, according to a new study.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094358.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Novel transdisciplinary study uncovers microbes that may one day deter major grape disease

Mon, 23 Oct 2017 09:43:48 EDT - Researchers have conducted a novel transdisciplinary study to characterize the microbial communities within the vascular system of grapevines and their connections with Pierce's disease, an economically significant disease of the California grape industry. Through the study, the researchers found potentially beneficial microbes that could one day be used as a deterrent to Xylella fastidiosa, the pathogen that causes Pierce's disease.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171023094348.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Exploring how herpes simplex virus changes when passed between family members

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 18:25:47 EDT - A new study offers a rare glimpse into the genetics of a herpes simplex virus transmission event -- information that may prove useful in future development of therapeutics and vaccines. The study reveals nearly perfect genetic transmission of the virus from a father to his son and lays the foundation for future studies exploring the genetic diversity of this virus.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020182547.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Pollution responsible for 16 percent of early deaths globally

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 18:25:13 EDT - Diseases caused by pollution were responsible in 2015 for an estimated 9 million premature deaths -- 16 percent of all deaths worldwide, according to a report.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020182513.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Mountain glaciers shrinking across Western U.S.

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 18:25:01 EDT - A technique using satellites to create twice-yearly elevation maps of US mountain glaciers provides new insight into thinning of glaciers in the lower 48 states.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020182501.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Prozac in ocean water a possible threat to sea life

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 12:58:09 EDT - Oregon shore crabs exhibit risky behavior when they're exposed to the antidepressant Prozac, making it easier for predators to catch them, according to a new study.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020125809.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

US ocean observation critical to understanding climate change, but lacks long-term national planning

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 12:57:58 EDT - Ocean observing systems are important as they provide information essential for monitoring and forecasting changes in Earth's climate on timescales ranging from days to centuries. A new report finds that continuity of ocean observations is vital to gain an accurate understanding of the climate, and calls for a decadal, national plan that is adequately resourced and implemented to ensure critical ocean information is available to understand and predict future changes.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020125758.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Global CO2 emissions stalled for the third year in a row

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 10:53:41 EDT - The annual assessment of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by the JRC and the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) confirms that CO2 emissions have stalled for the third year in a row.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020105341.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

How the smallest bacterial pathogens outwit host immune defenses by stealth mechanisms

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 10:16:24 EDT - Despite their relatively small genome, mycoplasmas can cause persistent and difficult-to-treat infections in humans and animals. A study has shown how mycoplasmas escape the immune response. Mycoplasmas 'mask' themselves: They use their small genome in a clever way and compensate for the loss of an enzyme that is important for this process. This could be shown for the first time in vivo, thus representing a breakthrough in the research of bacterial pathogens.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020101624.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

'Antelope perfume' keeps flies away from cows

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 10:16:21 EDT - In Africa, tsetse flies transfer the sleeping sickness also to cattle. The damage is estimated to be about 4.6 billion US dollars each year. Experts have developed an innovative way of preventing the disease. Tsetse flies avoid waterbucks, a widespread antelope species in Africa. The scientists imitated the smell of these antelopes.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020101621.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Chromosomes may be knotted

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 10:16:18 EDT - Little is known about the structures of our genetic material, chromosomes, which consist of long strings that -- according to our experience -- should be likely to become knotted. However, up to now it has not been possible to study this experimentally. Researchers have now found that chromosomes may indeed be knotted.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020101618.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Carbon coating gives biochar its garden-greening power

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 10:16:15 EDT - New research has demonstrated how composting of biochar creates a very thin organic coating that significantly improves the biochar's fertilizing capabilities.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020101615.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Logged tropical rainforests still support biodiversity even when the heat is on

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 09:22:42 EDT - Tropical rainforests continue to buffer wildlife from extreme temperatures even after logging, a new study has revealed.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020092242.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Waterside lighting drastically disrupts wildlife in the surrounding ecosystem

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 09:22:29 EDT - Streetlights near waterways attract flying insects from the water and change the predator community living in the grass beneath the lights, new research has found. The findings show that artificial night-time lighting could have implications for the surrounding ecosystem and biodiversity, which should be considered when designing new lighting concepts.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020092229.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Life goes on for marine ecosystems after cataclysmic mass extinction

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 09:22:26 EDT - One of the largest global mass extinctions did not fundamentally change marine ecosystems, scientists have found.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020092226.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Cool roofs have water saving benefits too

Fri, 20 Oct 2017 09:22:13 EDT - The energy and climate benefits of cool roofs have been well established: By reflecting rather than absorbing the sun's energy, light-colored roofs keep buildings, cities, and even the entire planet cooler. Now a new study has found that cool roofs can also save water by reducing how much is needed for urban irrigation.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171020092213.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New NASA study improves search for habitable worlds

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 18:18:49 EDT - New NASA research is helping to refine our understanding of candidate planets beyond our solar system that might support life.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019181849.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Climate shifts shorten marine food chain off California

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 17:16:37 EDT - Environmental disturbances such as El Niño shake up the marine food web off Southern California, new research shows, countering conventional thinking that the hierarchy of who-eats-who in the ocean remains largely constant over time.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019171637.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Research yields test to predict bitter pit disorder in Honeycrisp apples

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 16:43:00 EDT - A test to determine whether bitter pit -- a disorder that blindsides apple growers by showing up weeks or months after picking -- will develop in stored Honeycrisp apples was developed by a team of researchers, promising to potentially save millions of dollars annually in wasted fruit.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019164300.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Field trips of the future?

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 16:42:20 EDT - A biologist examines the benefits and drawbacks of virtual and augmented reality in teaching environmental science.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019164220.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New tyrannosaur fossil is most complete found in Southwestern US

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 14:30:40 EDT - A fossilized skeleton of a tyrannosaur discovered in Utah's Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument was airlifted by helicopter Oct 15, and delivered to the Natural History Museum of Utah where it will be uncovered, prepared, and studied. The fossil is approximately 76 million years old and is likely an individual of the species Teratophoneus curriei.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019143040.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Studying insect behavior? Make yourself an ethoscope!

Thu, 19 Oct 2017 14:30:37 EDT - Fruit flies have surprising similarities to humans. The mysteries of a broad range of human conditions can be studied in detail in these organisms, however this often requires the use of expensive custom equipment. team of scientists now present the ethoscope -- a cheap, easy-to-use and self-made customizable piece of equipment of their invention that can be used to study flies' behavior.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171019143037.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

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