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Survey results show Christians becoming less concerned about the environment

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 11:30:20 EST - There has been no "greening of Christianity" among people in the pews, despite efforts by some religious leaders to emphasize environmental stewardship, according to new research.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180123113020.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Curcumin improves memory and mood

Tue, 23 Jan 2018 10:19:08 EST - Daily consumption of a certain form of curcumin -- the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color -- improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180123101908.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New Eocene fossil data suggest climate models may underestimate future polar warming

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 18:46:07 EST - A new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122184607.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Scientists discover 'Legos of life'

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 17:55:26 EST - Scientists have found the “Legos of life” – four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism – after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts. The four building blocks make energy available for humans and all other living organisms, according to a new study.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122175526.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New neuron-like cells allow investigation into synthesis of vital cellular components

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 16:47:02 EST - A new method to create synthetic neurons allows researchers to investigate how the human brain makes metabolic building blocks essential for the survival of all living organisms. A new study describes a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of these building blocks, called purines, and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122164702.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Ancient rice heralds a new future for rice production

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:08:54 EST - Growing in crocodile infested billabongs in the remote North of the country, Australia's wild rice has been confirmed as the most closely related to the ancient ancestor of all rices. The unique genetics of the Australian rice may help breed disease resistance and climate adaptation into rice modern production species.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150854.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:08:13 EST - Marijuana use -- by either men or women -- does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150813.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stopped

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:58 EST - Facing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150758.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New Caledonian crows extract prey faster with complex hooked tools

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:56 EST - Biologists have discovered why some crows 'craft' elaborate hooked tools out of branched twigs.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150756.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Climate change and snowmelt -- turn up the heat, but what about humidity?

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:54 EST - Changes in humidity may determine how the contribution of snowpack to streams, lakes and groundwater changes as the climate warms. Surprisingly, cloudy, gray and humid winter days can actually cause the snowpack to warm faster, increasing the likelihood of melt during winter months when the snowpack should be growing, the authors report. In contrast, under clear skies and low humidity the snow can become colder than the air, preserving the snowpack until spring.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150754.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Pathway opens to minimize waste in solar energy capture

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:49 EST - Researchers have made an important discovery with significant implications for the future of solar cell material design.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150749.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Digging deep into distinctly different DNA

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:42 EST - A new discovery has deepened our understanding of the genetic mutations that arise in different tissues, and how these are inherited. Researchers found the rates of genetic mutations in mitochondrial DNA vary across differing tissue types, with the highest rate occurring in reproductive cells.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150742.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Combined nutrients and warming massively increase methane emissions from lakes

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:39 EST - Shallow lakes in agricultural landscapes will emit significantly greater amounts of methane, mostly in the form of bubbles (ebullition) in a warmer world, which is a potential positive feedback mechanism to climate warming. Submerged plants are key predictors of methane ebullition. The combination of warming with the loss of plants appears to transform shallow lakes into methane bubbling machines.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150739.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Kicking an old can of worms -- the origin of the head in annelids

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:07:11 EST - Researchers have described an exceptionally well-preserved new fossil species of bristle worm called Kootenayscolex barbarensis. Discovered from the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon fossil site in the Burgess Shale in Kootenay National Park, the new species helps rewrite our understanding of the origin of the head in annelids, a highly diverse group of animals which includes today's leeches and earthworms.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150711.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plants

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:06:47 EST - A new synthetic hormone promises to tease apart the many different roles of the plant hormone auxin and could lead to a new way to ripen fruit.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150647.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from sound of disturbed Asian honey bees

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 15:01:57 EST - A new study using playbacks, has for the first time shown that Asian elephants in Sri Lanka are scared of honey bees, much like their African counterparts. The study showed that Asian elephants responded with alarm to the bee simulations. They also retreated significantly further away and vocalized more in response to the bee sounds compared to controls.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122150157.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Role of cranial modification in identity formation: Did head shape encourage unity and cooperation in politics?

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 14:59:18 EST - It has long been recognized that the Inka incorporated diverse peoples into their empire, but how these ethnic groups developed historically during the political upheaval of the preceding Late Intermediate Period (LIP; AD 1100-1450) is only now receiving commensurate attention.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122145918.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

GoJelly project officially kicks off

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 11:10:39 EST - While the number of fish in our oceans continues to decrease, changing environmental conditions seem to favour jellyfish. They occur more often in large blooms. So far, they are considered annoying, if not dangerous. The project GoJelly aims to change that perception and to investigate the suitability of the organisms as microplastic filters, fertilizers or fish feed.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122111039.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Global temperature targets will be missed within decades unless carbon emissions reversed

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 11:09:46 EST - New projections by researchers could be the catalyst the world has sought to determine how best to meet its obligations to reduce carbon emissions and better manage global warming as defined by the Paris Agreement.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122110946.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

A race against pine: Wood-boring wasp in North America threatened by a Eurasian invader

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 11:08:29 EST - Invasive species have diverse impacts in different locations, including biodiversity loss, as a result of native species being outcompeted for similar resources. A US research team studied the case of an aggressive Eurasian woodwasp that has recently established in North America and poses a threat to a native competitor species.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122110829.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Research helps break ground to clean up land

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 11:08:22 EST - Researchers have been exploring the intricate shapes that emerge when air is injected into soil. These findings could one day be used to speed up the decontamination of industrial brownfield sites.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122110822.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Seabed mining could destroy ecosystems

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 10:40:50 EST - Mining on the ocean floor could do irreversible damage to deep-sea ecosystems, says a new study of seabed mining proposals around the world.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122104050.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Combination of resistance genes offers better protection for wheat against powdery mildew

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 10:40:47 EST - Plant researchers have tested newly developed wheat lines with improved resistance in field trials. They have demonstrated that a combination of two variations of a resistance gene provides wheat with better protection against the fungal disease.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122104047.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

New long-acting approach for malaria prophylaxis developed using nanomedicine approach

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 10:40:42 EST - A new study highlights a novel long-acting medicine for the prevention of malaria. The approach uses nanotechnology to improve the delivery of an existing antimalarial drug via a novel injectable format that can maintain blood concentration of the drug for weeks or months following a single dose.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122104042.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

How cells are able to turn

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 10:40:30 EST - Researchers have long wondered how our cells navigate inside the body. Two new studies have now demonstrated that the cells use molecular force from within to steer themselves in a certain direction. This knowledge may be of great significance in the development of new drugs.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122104030.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Female cats are more likely to be right-handed, researchers discover

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 10:40:19 EST - Researchers have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122104019.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Heat loss from the Earth triggers ice sheet slide towards the sea

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 09:13:21 EST - In North-East Greenland, researchers have measured the loss of heat that comes up from the interior of the Earth. This enormous area is a geothermal 'hot spot' that melts the ice sheet from below and triggers the sliding of glaciers towards the sea.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122091321.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Making fuel cells for a fraction of the cost

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 09:13:01 EST - Researchers now describe the development of an inexpensive, efficient catalyst material for a type of fuel cell called a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which turns the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity and is among the most promising fuel cell types to power cars and electronics.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122091301.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Sea turtle crisis: Moisture, not just heat impacts sex of sea turtle hatchlings

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 09:12:55 EST - Male sea turtles are disappearing and not just in Australia. Researchers found that 97 to 100 percent of hatchlings in southeast Florida have been female since 2002. They are the first to show why and how moisture conditions inside the nest in addition to heat affect the development and sex ratios of turtle embryos, using a novel technique they developed to estimate sex ratios with a male-specific, transcriptional molecular marker Sox9.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122091255.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from disease

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 09:12:52 EST - The vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122091252.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illness

Mon, 22 Jan 2018 09:12:43 EST - A major review has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralyzed children in the US, Canada and Europe.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180122091243.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Bio-renewable process could help ‘green’ plastic

Sun, 21 Jan 2018 10:34:02 EST - Plastics are often derived from petroleum, contributing to reliance on fossil fuels and driving harmful greenhouse gas emissions. To change that, scientists are trying to take the pliable nature of plastic in another direction, developing new and renewable ways of creating plastics from biomass.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180121103402.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Breakthrough study shows how plants sense the world

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 19:03:58 EST - Plants lack eyes and ears, but they can still see, hear, smell and respond to environmental cues and dangers. They do this with the aid of hundreds of membrane proteins that sense microbes or other stresses. Researchers now have created the first network map for 200 of these proteins. The map shows how a few key proteins act as master nodes critical for network integrity, and the map also reveals unknown interactions.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119190358.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environments

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 19:03:55 EST - A study examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119190355.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

'Programmable droplets' could enable high-volume biology experiments

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 19:03:50 EST - Researchers have developed hardware that uses electric fields to move droplets of chemical or biological solutions around a surface, mixing them in ways that could be used to test thousands of reactions in parallel.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119190350.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sediments

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 14:11:57 EST - More than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites. Radioactivity at these sites is 650 times higher than at unaffected sites upstream. The contamination comes from conventional, or non-fracked, oil and gas wastewater, which, under current state regulations, can still be treated and discharged into streams.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119141157.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

City lights setting traps for migrating birds

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 12:58:17 EST - A new study has examined how light pollution lures birds into urban areas during fall migration, a trend that poses risk for the fowl that often fly into buildings and has increased with the addition of brighter LED lights. The researchers were interested in seeing what factors shape the birds' distributions and why they occur in certain areas.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119125817.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Can being too social take years off your life?

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 12:22:53 EST - Large ground squirrels called yellow-bellied marmots live much longer, on average, if they are less social and more isolated than if they are more social and less isolated, a long-term study has found.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119122253.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Climate change linked to more flowery forests

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 11:35:19 EST - New research has revealed a surprising relationship between surging atmospheric carbon dioxide and flower blooms in a remote tropical forest.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119113519.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

The Pentagon built with mineralized microbes predating dinosaurs

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 11:35:00 EST - A new study has found that some of the building blocks of the Pentagon and Empire State Building were made by microbes that lived up to 340 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119113500.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

A survival lesson from bats: Eating variety keeps species multiplying

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 09:11:12 EST - A new study reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more new species in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119091112.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

How plants see light

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 09:03:44 EST - The proteins PCH1 and PCHL help plants adapt to their surroundings. Plants react sensitively to changes in their surroundings and possess the ability to adapt to them. They use the photoreceptor protein phytochrome B to see light and then regulate processes such as seed germination, seedling development, longitudinal growth and flower formation.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119090344.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Hunting dogs as possible vectors for the infectious disease tularaemia

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 09:02:37 EST - Tularaemia is an infectious bacterial disease that is life-threatening for rodents, rabbits and hares, but which can also infect humans and dogs. While contact with contaminated blood or meat makes hunters a high-risk group, the frequency of infections among hunting dogs has not been much studied. Researchers have now confirmed a relevant prevalence of infections in Austrian hunting dogs following a serological study in which seven percent of the animals tested positive. This could lead to more intense debate as to whether the often asymptomatic animals represent an additional risk of infection for people.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119090237.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Animal carnivores could be our powerful allies

Fri, 19 Jan 2018 08:59:52 EST - Animal carnivores living in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate -- but they may provide crucial benefits to human societies. Researchers have revealed that predators and scavengers ranging from bats to leopards and vultures are valuable to human health and well-being.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180119085952.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Temporary 'bathtub drains' in the ocean concentrate flotsam

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 17:53:18 EST - An experiment using hundreds of plastic drifters in the Gulf of Mexico shows that rather than simply spread out, as current calculations would predict, many of them clumped together in a tight cluster.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118175318.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Long-term warming trend continued in 2017: NASA, NOAA

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 17:37:11 EST - Continuing the planet's long-term warming trend, globally averaged temperatures in 2017 were 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.90 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 mean, according to scientists.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118173711.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Why animals diversified on Earth: Cancer research provides clues

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:24:58 EST - Can tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about half a billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162458.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

20 percent more trees in megacities would mean cleaner air and water, lower carbon and energy use

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:24:55 EST - Planting 20 percent more trees in our megacities would double the benefits of urban forests, like pollution reduction, carbon sequestration and energy reduction. The authors of the study say city planners, residents and other stakeholders should start looking within cities for natural resources and conserve the nature in our urban areas by planting more trees.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162455.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

First evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmaking

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:24:53 EST - Scholars have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.'


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162453.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Researchers create first stem cells using CRISPR genome activation

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:24:49 EST - In a scientific first, researchers have turned skin cells from mice into stem cells by activating a specific gene in the cells using CRISPR technology. The innovative approach offers a potentially simpler technique to produce the valuable cell type and provides important insights into the cellular reprogramming process.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162449.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Using data mining to make sense of climate change

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:24:43 EST - Experts have developed a new way of mining data from climate data sets that is more self-contained than traditional tools. The methodology brings out commonalities of data sets without as much expertise from the user, allowing scientists to trust the data and get more robust -- and transparent -- results.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162443.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 16:24:37 EST - In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study. Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and brain infections in both people and animals.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118162437.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Paleolithic diet healthier for overweight women

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:29:11 EST - Overweight women after menopause who eat a Paleolithic diet can maintain weight loss in the long term. The levels of risk factors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases also decrease.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142911.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Atmospheric changes leave their mark in tree rings

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:29:09 EST - A new study shows the chemical register of climate change and global episodes such as volcanic eruptions in high-mountain centennial forests in the Iberian Peninsula (Spain).


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142909.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Large volcanic island flank collapses trigger catastrophic eruptions

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:29:05 EST - New research not only implies a link between catastrophic volcanic eruptions and landslides, but also suggests that landslides are the trigger. At the heart of Tenerife and standing almost 4 km high, Teide is one of the largest volcanoes on Earth. Over a period of several hundred thousand years, the previous incarnations of Teide have undergone a repeated cycle of very large eruptions, collapse, and regrowth.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142905.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Global analysis reveals how sharks travel the oceans to find food

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:29:03 EST - You’ve heard of “you are what you eat” - this research shows that for sharks, the more relevant phrase is “you are where you ate.”


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142903.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

More genes are active in high-performance maize

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:29:01 EST - When two maize inbred lines are crossed with each other, an interesting effect occurs: The hybrid offspring have a significantly higher yield than either of the two parent plants. Scientists have now investigated a number of genetically distinct hybrids. They showed that the offspring had many more active genes than the original parents. These results may help in the cultivation of even higher-yielding maize varieties.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142901.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Bovine tuberculosis shows genetic diversity throughout Africa

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:27:49 EST - Bovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis that affects cattle as well as other animals and humans. Now, by combining genotyping M. bovis samples from cows across African countries, researchers have been able to study the diversity and evolution of the disease.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142749.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:27:35 EST - Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research, certain mutations in the genome of influenza A may help counteract the weakening effects of other mutations.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142735.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

First global atlas of the bacteria living in your dirt

Thu, 18 Jan 2018 14:27:28 EST - What lives in your dirt? Researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.


Link: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180118142728.htm
Source: sciencedaily.com

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